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1 Also written Montague or Montacute Pole, Lord Henry 1st Baron Montagu (I307)
 
2

Biography

William Hastings, born about 1431, was the eldest son of Sir Leonard Hastings and his wife Alice Camoys, daughter of Thomas de Camoys, 1st Baron Camoys.

Hastings succeeded his father in service to the House of York and through this service became close to his distant cousin the future Edward IV, whom he was to serve loyally all his life. He was High Sheriff of Warwickshire and High Sheriff of Leicestershire in 1455.

He fought alongside Edward at the Battle of Mortimer's Cross and was present at the proclamation of Edward as king in London on 4 March 1461 and then when the new king secured his crown at the Battle of Towton shortly thereafter. He was knighted on the field of battle. With the establishment of the Yorkist regime, Hastings became one of the key figures in the realm, most importantly as Master of the Mint and Lord Chamberlain, an office he held for the duration of the reign and which made him one of the most important means of access to the king. He was also created Baron Hastings, a title reinforced by grants of land and office, primarily in Leicestershire and Northamptonshire. In 1462 he was invested as a Knight of the Garter.

In 1474, he was awarded royal licence to crenellate (fortify his lands) at three of his landholdings in Leicestershire; at Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Kirby Muxloe, and at Bagworth. He built extensively at Ashby, mostly making additions to the pre-existing manor house built by the de la Zouch family in the thirteenth century. His greatest achievement at Ashby was, of course, the Hastings Tower – an imposing and thoroughly impressive creation. At Kirby Muxloe Castle he began an intricate and beautiful fortified house of red brick, one of the first of its kind in the county. Thanks to English Heritage, the castles at Ashby and Kirby can still be seen, but regrettably nothing survives to indicate any construction at Bagworth.

His importance in these years is recorded in a number of sources and was recognised by the greatest peer in the realm, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick. In 1462, Warwick arranged for Hastings to marry his widowed sister, Katherine Neville.

Despite this matrimonial relationship with the Nevilles, when Warwick drove Edward IV into exile in 1470, Hastings went with Edward and accompanied the king back the following spring. Hastings raised troops for Edward in the English Midlands and served as one of the leading captains of the Yorkist forces at both Barnet and Tewkesbury.

His service, loyalty, and ability, along with the fall of his Neville in-laws, made Hastings even more important during the second half of Edward IV's reign. He continued to serve as Chamberlain and was awarded the position of Chamberlain of the Exchequer in 1471, which he held until 1483. He was also appointed Lieutenant of Calais, which made him an important player in foreign affairs, and given authority over an increasingly large section of the English Midlands. At court, he was involved in two lengthy feuds with members of Queen Elizabeth Woodville's family, most notably with her son Thomas Grey, first Marquess of Dorset.

Death

After the death of Edward IV on 9 April 1483, the dowager queen sought to monopolise political power for her family by appointing family members to key positions and rushing the coronation of her young son Edward V as king, thereby circumventing Richard, Duke of Gloucester, whom the late king had appointed Lord Protector. Hastings, who had long been friendly with Richard and hostile to the Woodvilles, was a key figure in checking these manoeuvres. While keeping the Woodvilles in check in London, Hastings informed Richard of their proceedings and asked him to hasten to London. Richard intercepted the young king, who also was on his way to London, with his Woodville relatives. Hastings then supported Richard's formal installation as Lord Protector and collaborated with him in the royal council.

Affairs changed dramatically on 13 June 1483 during a council meeting at the Tower of London: Richard, supported by the Duke of Buckingham, accused Hastings and two other council members of having committed treason by conspiring against his life with the Woodvilles, with Hastings's mistress Jane Shore (formerly also mistress to Edward IV and possibly Dorset), acting as a go-between. While the other alleged conspirators were imprisoned, Hastings was immediately beheaded on Richard's orders over a log in the courtyard of the Tower.

The summary execution of the popular Hastings was controversial among contemporaries and has been interpreted differently by historians and other authors: while the traditional account, harking back to authors of the Tudor period including William Shakespeare, considered the conspiracy charge invented and merely a convenient excuse to remove Hastings (who was known for his loyalty to the dead king and his heirs) as while he remained alive he would have been too formidable an obstacle to Richard's own plans to seize the throne, others have been more open to the possibility of such a conspiracy and that Richard merely reacted to secure his position.

Despite the accusations of treason, Richard did not issue an attainder (those condemned for a serious crime would lose their life, property and hereditary titles including the right to pass those titles onto an heir) against Hastings and his family. Hence his wife and sons were allowed to inherit his lands and properties. Hastings himself was buried in the north aisle of St George's Chapel, Windsor, next to Edward IV.

References
This information was extracted from the Wikipedia page "William Hastings, 1st Baron Hastings". These notes should not be considered fact - please refer to the original Wikipedia article and the references contained therein. 

Hastings, William 1st Baron Hastings (I275)
 
3 Alec was born as Patrick to William Vines and Mary-Anne Mullen, at that time the family resided in Kilquade. The birth was registered by Bridget Duffy of Newtown. No relationship or information is provided beyond 'present at brith'. Vines, Patrick "Alec" (I78)
 
4 Anna and William are 1st cousins. Family F38
 
5 Baptised Devine. Vines, Mary Anne (I14)
 
6 Baptised William Redmond O'Brien, William "Bill" (I499)
 
7 Beheaded on the orders of Richard III (at the time he was Duke of Gloucester). Hastings, William 1st Baron Hastings (I275)
 
8 Ben died at home, in the presence of his wife Eliza, four months after the birth of his son Peter. He was 51.
 
Henderson, Benjamin "Ben" (I48)
 
9 Buried in the same tomb as her husband. Her effigy appears along-side his. Pole, Katherine (I272)
 
10 Cause of Death: Cardiac Failure due to Endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart chambers and valves). Ivers, Ellen "Ciss" (I580)
 
11 Cause of Death: General debility, No medical attendant. Informant: Patrick Russell (Son). Russell, Matthew (I514)
 
12 Cause of Death: Pneumonia, 5 Days. Byrne, Catherine (I510)
 
13 Census of Ireland 1901/1911 Source (S43)
 
14 Census of Ireland 1901/1911 Source (S44)
 
15 Conceived before her parents married. Vines, Elizabeth "Lizzie" (I6)
 
16 D.D. (Divinitatis Doctor) Advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity Burslem, Reverend James D.D. (I410)
 
17 Definition of LL.D: Legum Doctor (english: Doctor of Laws) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law, or an honorary doctorate, depending on the jurisdiction. The double L in the abbreviation refers to the early practice in the University of Cambridge to teach both Canon Law and Civil Law, the double L indicating the plural, Doctor of both laws.  Cobbe, Reverend Dr. Richard Chaloner LL.D. (I395)
 
18 Died aged 15. Registered as Devine. Vines, John (I13)
 
19 Died due to Diphtheria (7 days, Certified) Redmond, Sarah Catherine (I516)
 
20 Died from diabetic toxaemia due to gangrene. McCallogh White, Elizabeth "Eliza" (I47)
 
21 Died giving birth to her 10th child the Hon. Richard Godolphin Henry Hastings. Cobbe, Frances Countess of Huntingdon (I225)
 
22 Died unmarried and without issue Hastings, Selina Elizabeth (I237)
 
23 Died unmarried and without issue. Hastings, Captain Henry 3rd West India Regiment (I238)
 
24 Died without marrying or having issue Hastings, Captain Ferdinando 11th West India Regiment (I239)
 
25 Elizabeth marries Ben as McCallum.

Later when she registers her children she will alternate between using McCallum (for Mary - the middle child), White (for the remaining Henderson children) and then Henderson (when registering the Farrell children).

When marrying Pat Farrell she uses Henderson as her maiden name and lists her father as Edward McCullagh.

In short: I have yet to investigate her background. I'm noting this here because it is evident on her children's documents. I can also confirm from first hand knowledge that the people listed against White are indeed Benjamin Henderson's children and a part of that family. 
McCallogh White, Elizabeth "Eliza" (I47)
 
26 Formerly Queen's Square. Now renamed Pearse Square. Lowe, John (I479)
 
27 Fowler is buried in the Chancel of St Peter's Church. The stone reads:

Frances, daughter of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Sept. 5, 1754, aged 28.
Fowler, son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Jan 4, 1758, aged 34.
John Oldershaw, surgeon,
eldest son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Oct 18 1762, aged 42.
Fowler Oldershaw died Sept. 13 1749, aged 57.
Joan his wife died April 15, 1771, aged 80.
 
Oldershaw, Fowler (I413)
 
28 Fowler is buried in the Chancel of St Peter's Church. The stone reads:

Frances, daughter of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Sept. 5, 1754, aged 28.
Fowler, son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Jan 4, 1758, aged 34.
John Oldershaw, surgeon,
eldest son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Oct 18 1762, aged 42.
Fowler Oldershaw died Sept. 13 1749, aged 57.
Joan his wife died April 15, 1771, aged 80.
 
Oldershaw, Fowler (I418)
 
29 Frances is buried in the Chancel of St Peter's Church. The stone reads:

Frances, daughter of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Sept. 5, 1754, aged 28.
Fowler, son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Jan 4, 1758, aged 34.
John Oldershaw, surgeon,
eldest son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Oct 18 1762, aged 42.
Fowler Oldershaw died Sept. 13 1749, aged 57.
Joan his wife died April 15, 1771, aged 80.
 
Oldershaw, Frances (I417)
 
30 Frequently used the name Marshall Godolphin Cobbe Cobbe, William Marshall Godolphin (I394)
 
31 Funeral Mass celebrated in Franciscan Church, Merchants Quay, Dublin. Ivers, Patrick (I584)
 
32 I am unable to locate a civil record for Margaret - I am assuming she died before the introduction of the civil registration of deaths in January 1864. Tierney, Margaret (I450)
 
33 I have yet to find any records of Mary's death but her parents will use the name again in 12 years when they have twins. Henderson, Mary (I154)
 
34 In 1833 the local church was St. Patrick's in Barranisky, built to replace the Redcross parish church destroyed in 1798. A small church would later be built in Avoca village but was soon deemed insufficient to deal with the large numbers of miners who moved to the area. Construction began on what would become the Avoca 'Parish Church' (located in the village) in 1860. The previous church was converted into a National School. Family F131
 
35 Information was initially found on the site listed below. Cross-checked with Civil Death Registration to confirm. Baptism was Mar 7th. Death was registered in first quarter of 1907 (Jan-Feb-Mar)

1906 Balla Castlebar. Castlebar North, 53 Births

Twins no names male to James STAUNTON and Margaret TIERNEY Snugborough December 22 Baptized March 7 1907

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~deesegenes/1906.htm 
Staunton, Unnamed Twin Boy (I94)
 
36 Information was initially found on the site listed below. Cross-checked with Civil Death Registration to confirm. Baptism was Mar 7th. Death was registered in first quarter of 1907 (Jan-Feb-Mar).

1906 Balla Castlebar. Castlebar North, 53 Births

Twins no names male to James STAUNTON and Margaret TIERNEY Snugborough December 22 Baptized March 7 1907

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~deesegenes/1906.htm 
Staunton, Unnamed Twin Boy (I93)
 
37 James Troy and Maria Deveraux act as sponsors.
The register records his date of birth as 1st May and the home address as Ballyronan. 
Vines, Patrick "Alec" (I78)
 
38 Jane is a twin and her birth record tells us she was the younger of the two born 10 minutes after her brother at 9:40pm Vines, Jane (I32)
 
39 Joan is buried in the Chancel of St Peter's Church. The stone reads:

Frances, daughter of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Sept. 5, 1754, aged 28.
Fowler, son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Jan 4, 1758, aged 34.
John Oldershaw, surgeon,
eldest son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Oct 18 1762, aged 42.
Fowler Oldershaw died Sept. 13 1749, aged 57.
Joan his wife died April 15, 1771, aged 80.
 
Tilecoate, Joan (I414)
 
40 John is a twin and his birth record tells us he was the eldest of the two born 10 minutes before his sister at 9:30pm Vines, John (I30)
 
41 John is buried in the Chancel of St Peter's Church. The stone reads:

Frances, daughter of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Sept. 5, 1754, aged 28.
Fowler, son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Jan 4, 1758, aged 34.
John Oldershaw, surgeon,
eldest son of Fowler Oldershaw,
died Oct 18 1762, aged 42.
Fowler Oldershaw died Sept. 13 1749, aged 57.
Joan his wife died April 15, 1771, aged 80.
 
Oldershaw, John (I419)
 
42 Kate was actually legally registered as Kate Farrell - not Catherine. I have left Kate as a nickname because the name Catherine is associated with her - on her grave, memorial cards, death registration... Farrell, Catherine "Kate" (I54)
 
43 Katherine died at an unknown date but her will was proved on 15 Mar 1504.
Her will requested "my body to be buried in our Lady Chappell with the parish church of Ashby de la Zouch, between the image of our Lady and the place assigned for the vicar's grave."  
Neville, Katherine Baroness Hastings (I276)
 
44 Last address of Diana Lees at her time of death. Back then it was referred to as Waterloo Place, now it is simply Upper Leeson Steet. The house would eventually be the home to "Dublin's Nazi No. 1" Adolf Mahr and his family. Recommended reading: http://amzn.to/2khOe2l Lees, Diana (I186)
 
45 Legally registered Divine in 1866 for her birth. Her death registration is Vines Divine, Ellen (I16)
 
46 Legally registered Vine at birth in 1868 and Vines at death in 1872. Vine, James (I17)
 
47 Legally registered as 'Christy' Farrell, Christopher "Christy" (I56)
 
48 Legally registered as William Vine in 1864. In the 1901 census he is Vines and by the 1911 census he becomes Divine. In death his headstone reads VinesVines, William (I20)
 
49 Myocardial Degeneration resulting in Cardiac Failure Vines, Mary Anne (I14)
 
50 No longer in existence but info pulled from 1908 to 1915 Electoral Rolls records. Coxwell-Rogers, Norman Annesley (I151)
 

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